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What is ARDYIS?

ARDYIS is a framework of actions which aims to raise the capacity and opportunities of youth in agriculture through ICTs in ACP countries (Africa, Caribbean and Pacific).

Its key activities include the Youth in Agriculture Blog Competition (YoBloCo Awards) and the AgriHack Talent initiative.

The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA), in collaboration with FARA, Yam-Pukri, CAFAN, AYF, ANAFE, SPC/PAFPNET and e-Agriculture is pleased to launch the 2nd Edition of the Youth in Agriculture Blog Competition (YoBloCo Awards).

This contest is organised in the framework of the ARDYIS project, which aims to raise youth awareness and improve their capacity on agricultural and rural development issues in ACP countries using Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs).

The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA), in collaboration with CAFAN, FARA, Yam-Pukri, AYF, ANAFE, SPC/PAFPNET and e-Agriculture is launching today, the 2nd Edition of the Youth in Agriculture Blog Competition (YoBloCo Awards) at the Caribbean Week of Agriculture in Guyana.

Tuesday 17 September 2013, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC)

The five-day regional training for Pacific island countries and territories, held in Nadi, Fiji from 16 –20 September brought together 23 participants from 12 Pacific states (Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Palau, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu) to learn about the use of social media as a web 2.0 innovation to create and share content for information exchange.

Monday, 12 August 2013 19:26

Migration: a development journey...

My name is Grace Muinga, an agricultural economist by profession. I have a Bachelors and a Master’s degree in Agriculture Economics from Egerton University in Kenya and University of Reading, UK respectively. I hail from Kenya. I have a passion for improving the food security situation in developing countries as well as reducing uncertainty and risk in the agriculture environment so as to increase investments and improve decision making. I am also keen on improving livelihoods in Kenya as well as Africa.

I am pretty much a city girl. I was born at a hospital in the city centre of the capital of Brazil, Brasilia. I grew up playing in and with another children in the streets using my rollers, adventuring in homemade karts (known as rolimãs in Brazil) or even running around because of the well-known “hide and seek” game. I was also born in the revolutionary ICT age: I remember using my 256 MB memory computer to type some of my journalistic works when I was 8 years old and waiting long 15 minutes to connect my dial internet in order to use my ICQ. Yes, I think my childhood could not be more urban. Definitely, I am a city girl.

“I Left Nigeria Once, I will Leave Again” - Many might wonder what I am talking about. But before I tell you where I left for and why, let me give you a brief background on my journey into Agriculture. As a young boy, I grew up around computers. From an early age I could handily clone, with my own hands and with no help, a desktop computer courtesy of learning from my father. Little wonder then, that I wanted to study to be an Electrical and Electronics Engineer. But as life would have it, I got admitted into the University to study Agricultural Engineering instead (A full 5 years of agriculture).

I come from a small village in France called "Toutlemonde"; it literally means "All the World" or "everybody". Not sure this drew my destiny but fact is that I am both representative of rural-urban migration and emigration.

This year’s International Youth Day celebration is themed “Youth and Migration: Moving Development Forward.” The focus is for young people to discuss issues surrounding rural-urban and country to country youth migration. This situation needs attention because statistics show that 30% of migration occurs among youths.

Monday, 12 August 2013 18:26

Get Youth Involved and They will stay!

With nearly 28 million people, though Nepal is predominantly an agrarian country, migration is increasingly becoming an important livelihood strategy for farm households in rural Nepal. Remittance has emerged as the lifeblood as earnings through agriculture in rural areas is insufficient and the youth prefer to go abroad where they have higher chances of earning more.

I am from a small rural community located in the southern part of the beautiful island, Trinidad. After completing my degree I moved back home but inadequate job opportunities in my field of study, inept mentorship programs and limited leisure activities at that time lead me to move to an urban community. Even though the rural communities were major providers of agricultural produce with the divestment of Caroni (1975) Limited the number of farmers and farming communities slowly dwindled.

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ICT and Youth in Agriculture in Africa (Report)

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