Home Ressources Publications clés

Suivez-nous!

Login Form



Publications
Publications

Publications (14)

Over 63 percent of the total population in Sub-Saharan Africa live in rural areas where agriculture remains the single largest source of employment and income. The transformation of subsistence agriculture and embarking on an agribusiness development path will drive economic growth, while providing increased employment opportunities and enhanced livelihoods for people living in poverty. Some field-based practical experiences and lessons now show promise for improving the employment opportunities of young people through agribusiness. From the point of view of farmers, producers and other actors in the value chain, there are opportunities to build agribusinesses through skills and training, technology and finance in order to improve productivity and add value to products.

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are emerging as increasingly valuable business tools for women entrepreneurs in developing countries. Making sure that women entrepreneurs are equipped to make productive use of such technologies is important from the perspective of achieving Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 3 on Promoting Gender Equality and Empowering Women and MDG 8 on a Global Partnership for Development to make available the benefits of ICTs.

book cover ardyis The new booklet published by the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA ACP-EU) features 20 young people and three organizations, that have been involved in the CTA youth project called ARDYIS (Agriculture Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society).

In addition to portraying authors and highlighting their perspectives on youth involvement in agriculture using ICTs, the document presents summaries of best essays submitted for the contest «Youth finding solutions to challenges in agriculture and rural development using ICTs!», organised in 2010; it also presents the results of the Youth in Agriculture Blog Competition (YoBloCo Awards) completed in 2012.

Vendredi 13 Mai 2011 10:16

African Youth Report 2011

African Youth Report 2011

The enormous benefits young people can contribute are realized when investment is made in young people’s education, employment, health care, empowerment and effective civil participation. Several initiatives on youth education and employment have been undertaken in Africa, but these need to be deepened in order to exploit the full potential of young people in contributing to poverty reduction and sustainable development.

The report seeks to promote new and deeper knowledge of the potential of African young people and the broad conditions that have an influence on this potential. It acknowledges the predicament of African young people today, noting that they share visions and aspirations that are seemingly beyond their reach, yet are essential elements of today’s societies and the future which awaits coming generations.

By Thérèse Burke & Ken Lohento

Agriculture in African, Caribbean and Pacific countries (ACP) faces many challenges. Most of these developing economies are heavily reliant on this sector for food security and economic growth. Agriculture accounts for over 50 percent GDP in some countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo. This coupled with the high percentage of population (up to 60 percent in Africa) living off the land, means that the need to secure the continued interest of youth in agriculture is imperative.

However, global attention is now turning to agricultural and rural development as a result of the 2007-2008 food price crisis. Despite this, it is still not perceived as an attractive industry for the younger population.

Le concours de rédaction du CTA sur les jeunes, le développement rural et les TIC a été une expérience qui a mis aux prises des jeunes de divers pays d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique (ACP). Son intérêt est qu’il renseigne sur des expériences de beaucoup pays. Un membre du jury en l’occurrence Annie Chéneau - Loquay  par ailleurs directrice de recherche au CNRS et responsable de l’Observatoire Africa’NTI (projet de recherche sur les modes d'insertion, les usages et les impacts des technologies de la communication en Afrique) a décliné les enseignements qu’on peut tirer de ce concours.

By Riten Chand Gosai, Pacific Regional Winner of the CTA ARDYIS Essay contest

Abstract
Agriculture continues to be the economic mainstay of the Fiji Islands and is metaphorically referred to as the backbone of the country. The sector, however, is not immune to obscurity and faces many challenges. Two of such challenges are the lack of agricultural information being disseminated to needy farmers and reluctance of small scale farmers to commercialize production. This essay examines how information and communication technology can be used to address these predicaments. Firstly, it will discuss how information poverty can be eradicated by the use of mobile phone applications, rural ‘telecentres’ with internet, video satellite presentations and the use of traditional media namely radio and television. Then it will entail how small holder farmers in Fiji can be encouraged to commercialize through interactive use of ICTs. These include enhancing production techniques, improving market access, stock control, quality control and the use of global positioning systems (GPS) in innovative farming. The essay also includes several examples of technologies that have been successfully implemented in other parts of the world in similar situations as the Fiji Islands.

By Gerald Musakaruka Mangena from Zimbabwe: Southern African Regional Winner of the CTA ARDYIS Essay contest

It is 7:00 in the morning, and a 28 year old Zimbabwean new farmer gets up to prepare for the day. This season she expects a good 500 tonnes of high quality potatoes. Today will be her first day of selling and she is still wondering where all these potatoes will be sold.

By Maureen Agena from Uganda: East African Regional Winner of the CTA ARDYIS Essay contest.

With over 88% of Uganda’s Population of 29 million being rural based and depending almost entirely on agriculture at various levels of livelihoods. It is widely held that access to accurate and timely information by rural communities can not only increase agricultural productivity; it can also result into enhanced economic and social development.

By Chris Mwangi from Kenya: East African Regional Winner of the CTA ARDYIS Essay contest

Currently, Kenya has four active mobile operators. The technology is the prime mode of communication in the country. Since its introduction, the industry has picked up quickly and remarkably, covering most of the geographical areas of the country and has contributed greatly to local peoples’ livelihoods.